✎✎✎ Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved

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Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved



And I am Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved shock there Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved people out there who think this is appropriate Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved middle school and high school kids. Equally shunned yet respected by all, she accepts the encumbrance of existence and pays her Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved Influenza Research Paper her ancestors in taking life as the precious treasure it is, forcing Milkman to ponder about his aimless one. Imagine a Nobel Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved reading her work, and then explaining her Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved. I tried this once and couldn't get past the first chapter. Her hair, her eyes, Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved countenance, her life, would never be considered more than an insult, not only to herself, but to her people, too. Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved ended up being a great surprise. Well, pestle advantages and disadvantages black Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved the same way. Though som I just read this today, and the rating system really doesn't apply to my feelings, which are still fresh, on this book : "I like it" "I really liked The Deaf In Prison, etc. Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved if other :.

Beloved by Tony Morrison: Plot, Characters, Themes \u0026 Symbols! *REVISION VIDEO*

Obviously, she belong in the canon of great black writers, great women writers, etc. She is wrestling with global themes and ideas that transcend race, sex, culture, and time. One of my absolute favorites, partly for the following: "You can't own a human being. And if it means so little to you that you can just give it away, hand it to him, then why One of my absolute favorites, partly for the following: "You can't own a human being.

View all 4 comments. Jun 06, Blair rated it really liked it Shelves: , american-classic , historical-fiction , magical-realism , nobel-laureate , african-american. Song of Solomon is the book that propelled Toni Morrison to literary fame. Published ten years earlier than 'Beloved', I much preferred this earlier work, although both deserve a re-read as both works are multi-layered and reluctant to give up all their secrets with just one reading.

At first, a bildungsroman of sorts, it is the story of his family in Michigan from the time of his birth in the 's to adul Song of Solomon is the book that propelled Toni Morrison to literary fame. At first, a bildungsroman of sorts, it is the story of his family in Michigan from the time of his birth in the 's to adulthood. Later, Milkman, in his search for identity, retraces his migratory roots, from Michigan to Pennsylvania, where his paternal grandfather was murdered, to Shalimar, Virginia where his ancestors were from. It is only by finding answers through this search that Milkman can make sense of the present and finally be free of the chains that are holding him down.

Morrison is a gifted writer with a poetic voice who packs alot into a page story. I'll need to revisit this story sometime and maybe it'll reveal itself to me a little bit more. My feeling of it now is that is a work of greatness that tried a bit too hard to be everything when it could've settled for being something. Highly recommended nonetheless. Beyond the deep-seated resignation at puzzle-piece popularity. I don't have anything against the forthright advocates of analysis at all levels of fiction.

Far from it. I simply believe that there is a time when one is able to p 4. I simply believe that there is a time when one is able to put the microscope back in the drawer and the fine-toothed comb on the top shelf, sit back, and say, Yes. Here is a story. It is a story of oppression, of hatred, of justified rage and passionate fury fighting against discrimination both big and small, both intentional and otherwise. If you come away from this review with one thing, know that large scale oppression, this horrible racism in the "land of the free" depicted in this book has existed, does exist, and will most certainly exist for a long, long while. Martin Luther King, Jr. Trayvon Martin. Facts and faces that may be forgotten or even denied, but the ideology that connects them all will always be rooted out by the plain evidence of its existence.

Every character has some measure of this rage, and every character is given their say in some fashion, fashions that often clash and bite and break the others around them. If the road to hell is paved with Good Intentions, the road to hell on earth is a yellow bricked road bounded on both sides by long sparkling walls of Indifference. Indifference is neither black nor white, neither good nor evil, and each of the characters illustrate this innate resistance to quick and easy pigeon-holing. At first you will love them, or you will hate them, and then the tables will switch, and you will be left with the unsatisfying satisfaction of reading about human beings. Unsatisfied satisfaction. Feeling that one is straddling two worlds due to the color of one's skin, when in reality just stuck in one really fucked up one that makes progress a constant battle.

Us versus them. The only guarantee is that a single step out of line will explode into violence. What can you do with this? What is a human being expected to do with this horrible paradox that is real life? This story poses the question to a boy-child who reaches and then passes the age of thirty in a safe, contained bubble, his head filled with safe, contained problems. He has no awareness of the context of his life, the family that surrounds him, the history that follows him, the society that defines him. He has long forgotten his dreams of flying. We've all forgotten our dreams of flying, you say.

Perhaps, I say. Would you like to be reminded? May 15, Reggie rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , favorites. In a criminal amount of oversimplification I will simply say that Song of Solomon is a perfect novel that has reached a higher level of perfection in my mind during this reread. I'm not sure how many more years of reading I have left, but I'm sure it will take a long time for me to read any work of literature that is better than this. I'll post some specfic thoughts soon, but in the mean time, my thoughts from my initial read in February of is below.

View 2 comments. Apr 28, Meike rated it liked it Shelves: read , usa. Milkman, the great-grandson of Solomon, leaves Michigan in search of the gold his father and aunt Pilate once left behind in a cage in Pennsylvania. At the beginning, he displays an attitude similar to his father, a heightened individualism that strives for personal gain and uses others.

Milkman has no deep emotional connection to his family and friends, and no spiritual connection to nature and the land like his great-grandfather and grandfather. And the dead you kill is yours. They stay with you anyway, in your mind. That way it frees up your mind. Just like in the case of the men, Morrison incorporates different worldviews and behavioral patterns when facing adversity, thus showing the broadness of the black experience. Still: There are many authors who have gotten the Nobel and it makes you wonder why they were chosen — not in the case of Morrison.

She is simply an amazing, highly gifted writer. Song of Solomon is a gorgeous work of fiction and a masterpiece of storytelling. Not as dark as her first two books, The Bluest Eye , Sula , it is more upbeat, but every bit as complex and rewarding. The leitmotif here is the stripping of layers from childhood mythology to reality as Milkman, the protagonist goes on a psychological journey to discover himself and understand where his family came from. The story takes place in an unnamed town probably Marquette in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan Song of Solomon is a gorgeous work of fiction and a masterpiece of storytelling. The story takes place in an unnamed town probably Marquette in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan as we learn from the first sentence: The North Caroline Mutual Life Insurance agent promised to fly from Mercy to the other side of Lake Superior at three o'clock.

Ruth and Macon are a rather unhappy couple: she is eccentric and nagging, he is overbearing and severe. Their children Magdelena called Lena and Corinthians chosen at random by opening a Bible and later Milkman a nickname he earns because his mother nurses him way past his weaning and is caught in the act by the village gossip, Freddie. She walks down to the shore of the lake and gets some driftwood which she uses to decorate the table which is ignored by her husband.

Ruth let the seawood disintegrate, and later, when its veins and stems dropped and curled into brown scabs on the table, she removed the bowl and brushed away the scabs. But the water mark, hidden by the bowl all these years, was exposed. On the less privileged side of town because Macon is rather well-off, living off of the rent of several buildings in various parts of the city , lives Pilate, her daughter Reba, and her daughter Hagar.

Milkman ignores a restriction from visiting the house and meets his aunt, eventually having a long-term relationship with his cousin, Hagar. The house, for a time is a haven for him: Near the window, hidden by the dark, he felt the irritability of the day drain from him and relished the effortless beauty of the women singing in the candlelight. Unfortunately, he is a bit maladroit and ends up peeing on his sister Magdalene's dress: He didn't mean it. It happened before he was through It was becoming a habit-this concentration on things behind him. Almost as though there were no future to be had. And indeed, this lack of future drives Milkman throughout the book. Milkman's family name, Dead is also highly symbolic and the result of a mistake at the Freedman's Bureau following the Civil War.

And he took it. Like a fuckin sheep. Somebody should have shot him. He was already Dead. That is one of the typical dialogs betweem Milkman and his best friend Guitar. The book does educate on various aspects of life for ex-slaces, how they got their names, the dangers of moving north and the racism they encountered there. The action in the novel picks up when Milkman breaks up with Hagar sending her into a murderous, self-destructive rage. We also learn of Guitar's involvement with an underground circle of men that take revenge for murders of black people by white vigilantes who get away with it in otherwords, all of them.

The book at this point after page 99 is a real page-turner as Milkman learns more and more about his past, Hagar slips further and further into insanity, and Guitar turns on his friend also in a homicidal rage over a misunderstanding. The book has some great opening lines for chapters, my favorite was this one for Chapter 7: Truly landlocked people know they are. Know the occasional Bitter Creek or Powder River that runs through Wyoming; the large tidy Salt Lake of Utah is all they have of the sea and that they must content themselves with bank , shore , and beach because they cannot claim a coast. And, having none, seldom dream of flight. As fleet and bright as a lodestar he wheeled toward Guitar and it did not matter which one of them would give up his ghost in the killing arms of his brother.

For now he knew what Shalimar knew: if you surrendered to the air, you could ride it. Mar 11, B. Rinehart rated it it was amazing Shelves: modernism-and-post-modernism-stuff , un-decade-african-descent , favorites. Though she's dead what's important is that we still have her books, her words, and the site of her memory. I read this book back in and she immediately became an old friend. Not one for modesty, her work is an authentic and commanding portrait of human life. This book in particular was my world and my grandfather's world recreated on the page in a way that few if any writers I've read has ever done.

Well--on y va! We learn about three to four generations of one family and, in-fact, one culture. I won't be beating around the bush in this review. The Dead family as a whole seems like an interesting archetype or counterpoint of The Sutpen family of Absalom, Absalom! This book shows a good example of Faulknerianism played straight and subverted in the hands of a Black writer. To be short: this is a great Black Southern Gothic novel. But that leads to talking about the greatest character of this novel Morrison took me places that I had not realized I needed to go. Even my animosity to the main character did not hurt this book to me because it did everything so well.

The chapters divided the story so well, I can only think of The Brothers Karamazov doing it better. The reason this book has struck me so well is how personal it is to African-American experience. This book alludes to White people and White supremacy, but you will be hard pressed to find a White person in it, much less with even a speaking line I think a white nurse from the beginning is all we are told in pages.

This is the first book I have read in a long time written by Black hands only concerning Black people on their own terms this is not accidental and it is refreshing! I can hear the true cadence of how my family talks to one another and the number of cultural references and inside jokes were amazing and I would be amazed if most non-African-Americans can pick it up. This book was written to a specific audience much of the small things in it go unexplained and I was surprised to see it all there. This more than anything will make me have to read Morrison again. I believe the only other Black writer to come close is James Baldwin in Go Tell It on the Mountain , but even he had to start "explaining" things that he would not have to do for a strictly African-American audience.

Names play a pivotal role in this story. Every significant character is given a symbolic name or nickname which is symbolic of how names play a role in African-American life. As is the truth in reality, if you are given a nickname it is rarely for a positive reason. This is taken further in that even the "real" names in this book are acquired in very unusual or strange ways. The locations of this story, particularly in the second half of the novel, are also very special to me as it shows the history of Black people's journey in-country. Though the story's main setting is Michigan, Milkman's " Roots " journey leads him not simply through a different land the mid-Atlantic and eventually the origin of African- Americans: Virginia , but literally in the magical realist sense back in time.

He goes back to his father and grandfather's time in Pennsylvania, but more importantly to me is that he went to central Virginia. When he talks about his journey into Virginia it hits me personally because my mother's family is from this land. I can see the landscape and almost the roads and shops of this area and I knew exactly what the climate was. This was another crucial factor in my reading this book—it is about the land of my ancestors as much as it is about the land of Milkman's ancestors.

The Southern Gothic nature of the novel is also worth talking about. Morrison is as much a fan of Faulkner as she is critic. This book takes the haunted nature of gothic fiction and manages to put it in an urban, mid-western environment. The city of Mercy, Michigan is as much haunted by slavery and its legacy as Jefferson, Mississippi. The difference is that the stakes are a lot higher and the fallout more severe for the Black inhabitants in Morrison's universe versus the White inhabitants of Faulkner's. To conclude, if you want to read a story about one man's search for his place in the world in the middle of the 20th century, this is your book. Seems I would be fined if I did not mention that somewhere. It was a very well used trope. Jan 11, brian rated it really liked it Recommended to brian by: michelle, mindy, sandi, jessica treat, dfj, yvette, ruth, alisa,.

View all 90 comments. Toni Morrison is perhaps the most important writer living today and Song of Solomon is perhaps the best novel of the last 50 years of American life. Despite the high standing of both novel and author, there are many that chide both for delving too far into the world of African American mythology. The book, according to a reviewer on this very website, bitterly states that Song of Solomon is more fable than novel. Attempting to paint the novel as fable undercuts its central mission: to highlight Toni Morrison is perhaps the most important writer living today and Song of Solomon is perhaps the best novel of the last 50 years of American life.

Attempting to paint the novel as fable undercuts its central mission: to highlight the important role of mythology in linking African Americans to their past by creating narratives for those that were lost during slavery, Jim Crow, and black peril. The novel is not fable, but the recreation and reconnection of Milkman, symbolic of his own community, reconnecting with a lost past. The gaffe by the reviewers is understandable, however, as mythology has lost credibility due to the ferocious rise of science. Morrison, quite rightly, attempts to delve into mythology to try to answer pertient questions about Black history.

Much of the mythology in Song of Solomon revolves around flight. For hundreds of years, there has been a belief among the Black community that people of color could fly; that is was one their gifts. While for residents of the scientific age people flying seems trite, for Morrison and other people of color the ability to fly seems only natural. The difference in the thought processes is derived from educational differences. European education has tended to focus on empirical science while African education has tended to focus on familial values and cultural learning.

African education seeks to reunite the learner with the etymology of self while European education seeks some broad sort of social literacy engulfed in intimately knowing "other. It is only when he begins to seek out, understand, and embrace the mythology of his race and the roots planted by previous generations that he is able to connect, for the first time, with his community and experience that sort of bond that mythology can bring. This connection with the past and the necessity of finding one's own story is as important a theme as one could imagine, especially in an era where sameness, conformity, and the idea of the ethnic "mutt" have won some sort of cultural acceptance.

It is that theme--one of a resurrected connection with the past--that makes Morrison's novel of the utmost importance. We must all connect back to our mythology and begin to understand the language of previous generations in order to benefit ourselves. Apr 10, Read By RodKelly rated it it was amazing. Song of Solomon is the most brilliant novel ever written. Written chronologically, from the perspective of one character, Macon "Milkman" Dead, SoS is, on the surface, a perfect bildungsroman; our hero grows up and encounters difficulties that ultimately leave him at a crux where he must go on Song of Solomon is the most brilliant novel ever written. Written chronologically, from the perspective of one character, Macon "Milkman" Dead, SoS is, on the surface, a perfect bildungsroman; our hero grows up and encounters difficulties that ultimately leave him at a crux where he must go on a quest to empower, embolden, and strengthen his resolve, maturing him into manhood and true understanding of who he is in the world.

In Milkman's world, however, things aren't so simple and predicable. Part 1 is a brilliant but straightforward telling of our main character's life up to a certain point. But by Part 2, it becomes clear that the novel is more deeply concerned with history, about roots, about inheritance, reclamation of names, and the transcendence of earthly wealth for the wealth of truly knowing one's self. There is much concern with the idea of flight: Milkman is a man stuck and yearning for escape from the emptiness and stagnancy of his current reality but is continually mired in both ignorance and indifference to everything and everyone around him.

When he finally wakes up and decides to be a man, he goes on a literal quest to find gold, but winds up tracking his forefathers, gaining clarity about who he is and ultimately finding the key to true flight. It is the last third of the novel that gives me chills every time I read it. Morrison offers no explanations for her nebulous symbolism throughout the novel, but it is in this last section that the symbols and themes begin to offer a clear way into the story Special mention to the Solomon of the title, who's song and history, in the context of the novel, is impactful and emotionally affecting in a way that is indescribable.

He represents, for me, the lost great x10 grandfather of all of us black people, cut off from history because of slavery and this country's love of historical and cultural erasure. He is that lost ancestor who's song was the only possession he had to hand down, who song is the only way we have to tell our own stories View all 3 comments. Song of Solomon is a timeless classic and coming-of-age tale as told as only Toni Morrison can do in this moving and lyrical novel. I was so moved by the author's Forward to the book where she talks about the death of her father stressing that even in the grip of the unmanageable sadness and grief, that each of his four children was convinced that he loved him or her best by the gifts he shared with each throughout their lives, and how he spoke to each in the language only they understood.

Toni Song of Solomon is a timeless classic and coming-of-age tale as told as only Toni Morrison can do in this moving and lyrical novel. Toni Morrison says it best: "But it was the death of that girl--the one who lived in his head--that I mourned when he died. Even more than I mourned him, I suffered the loss of the person he thought I was, I think it was because I felt closer to him than to myself that, after his death, I deliberately sought his advice for writing the novel that continued to elude me. Whatever it is called--muse, insight, inspiration, 'the dark finger that guides,' 'bright angel'--it exists and, in many forms, I have trusted it ever since. Morrison tells us how she was guided to write this stunning novel from a male perspective.

What I found magnificent was the use of flight throughout the novel, sometimes in a mythical and magical way, other times metaphorical. Following Macon "Milkman" Dead as he explores the roots of his family and how that history has impacted him was a lovely novel with beautiful and lyrical writing by one of our best contemporary authors. Oct 08, Zanna rated it it was amazing Shelves: feminism , mab , bechdel-pass. Milkman's father, the man with the weird name and mysterious past, teaches his son to 'own things'. His sister is 'wild', she inhabits the opposite pole. Ownership does not occur to her.

When a kind woman brings her cherry jam on white bread, she weeps because the fruit she loves for the taste of sun and earth exploding, the feel of stalk and stone and bark-scraped knees, has lost these elements that forge the relationships between self and world and being that have nothing to do with property, Milkman's father, the man with the weird name and mysterious past, teaches his son to 'own things'. When a kind woman brings her cherry jam on white bread, she weeps because the fruit she loves for the taste of sun and earth exploding, the feel of stalk and stone and bark-scraped knees, has lost these elements that forge the relationships between self and world and being that have nothing to do with property, lines of nourishment and communication.

Lost those routes to ecstasy, and been, in a way, poisoned by sugar, the white addiction for which women and men were kidnapped and shipped across the Atlantic to cut cane in stolen fields. Own things! But Milkman has always had pleasant things for his use, unlike his friend Guitar, who longs for them. Instead of such things, he yearns for freedom of movement; for cars and trains and boats to carry him away, and for power over people. Both of them know they can seek these ends through money.

Their desire burns so brightly they forget to be just, to be kind. In Toni Morrison's books pain is powerful and histories bend hearts. What grows must grow from poisoned soil, reaching for healing in the sun if it can. She peels back skin to show us the potentialities lurking in the root. What will flower out of this? What will fruit? Like slow saplings or sudden briars the shoots of her stories unwind, organic, uncontrollable, smelling of the earth, rank and sweet.

I love this as a story of love both destructive and creative and for its mood and structure, cyclic and fluid rather than linear and climactic. I noticed that action initiated by men is often diffused by women, and when this does not happen there is a dangerous escalation of physical or emotional violence, though this is a severe simplification. The atmosphere reminded me very much of Katharine Mansfield's stories. This tale is sometimes like a mystery, signed with foreshadowings, flavoured with interludes of anguished self-reflection, male psyches working their half-conscious preoccupations, changing in the unexpected light of their encounters.

That Milkman's materialist quest leads him to its spiritual pretext is a fabular gift; how often is someone lucky enough to find what they need when they pursue what they want? Can I allow myself to believe that this doesn't only happen in tales? Mystery, fable, and also ghost story, for here the dead speak. Morrison tells us in the foreword that it was inspired by her own dead father's unexpectedly active presence in her life.

She invites us to hear our dead, and work to fathom their words, however strange. View all 18 comments. Jul 22, Rich rated it liked it. I would like to have given a lower rating because I simply did not enjoy the read, but there is a value to this book that I cannot deny. Powerfully written, and has great cultural insight and thought. But really, I couldn't relate very well -- perhaps that is the point in many cases. I can't explain it much better without spending more time looking at it again than I'd like to, so I'll leave it at this: I felt enlightened. I felt like shit. All without feeling very invested. She is quickly banished by his kingly father, who believes his sister has hidden stolen wealth in her home on the shameful side of the tracks.

It makes for a gripping tale, one that Morrison has made relevant to the time period and to all time: Women and children, left behind, grappling with the reality of flown fathers and lovers; women of wisdom whose life-choices are slim to nothing; coldblooded revenges that turn inward, sickening the perpetrators; true names that lie unrecorded— suppressed under wrested, false power. I'm really surprised and relieved that my first Toni Morrison was a huge success. I had assumed that her books would be too dark for me and I think some of them might be , but SOS turned out to be just the right book for me.

This novel has a parcel of amazingly odd characters who you want to hear more and more about. I would classify this as magical realism because the idea of magic hovers all throughout this text. The main p This is the first 5 star read of the year that wasn't a reread! The main plot of this novel is a search to understand one's heritage, but the joy I found whilst reading this came from the succinct, yet poetical writing style and those unique characters. This makes me consider reading all of her novels in and so eager to read the two other Morrisons I have on my shelves this year. Now in his thirties, he discovers a truth about his family history and embarks on a road trip that will change everything he knows about himself.

Song of Solomon is Toni Morrison's first attempt to write from a male protagonist's point of view. Though Milkman is our main character, which becomes more apparent in the second half of the novel, the joy of SOS is learning about the lives of Milkman's family. There are many strong, flawed female characters to connect with and fascinate the reader. This delving into the lives of all the characters is why I love SOS. Pilate, First Corinthians, Ruth, Hagar Throughout this novel is the image of flight, beginning with a scene in which a man wearing blue silk wings jumps from the roof of a building to his death. Hearkening back to the legend of Africans who literally fly away to escape slavery, this is just one element of magical realism that permeates to story of the Dead family.

SOS remains my favorite Morrison, and I look forward to rereading it again and again. View all 5 comments. This was my first experience with Toni Morrison's writing and it was probably not the usual entry point, most people seeming to start with Beloved or The Bluest Eye. However, for me it ended up being an enjoyable if slightly perplexing introduction. I found Song of Solomon more accessible than I had anticipated and I had a cracking good time reading it for the most part. The characters and dialogue really sing ; and there are some startlingly good set pieces that are emblazoned in my memo This was my first experience with Toni Morrison's writing and it was probably not the usual entry point, most people seeming to start with Beloved or The Bluest Eye.

The characters and dialogue really sing ; and there are some startlingly good set pieces that are emblazoned in my memory. The section in which Milkman approaches the abandoned Butler house and subsequently meets with Circe is a standout. Four graceful columns supported the portico, and the huge double door featured a heavy, brass knocker. He lifted it and let it fall; the sound was soaked up like a single raindrop in cotton. Nothing stirred. He looked back down the path and saw the green maw out of which he had come, a greenish-black tunnel, the end of which was nowhere in sight She was old. So old she was colorless. So old only her mouth and eyes were distinguishable features in her face.

Nose, chin, cheekbones, forehead, neck all had surrendered their identity to the pleats and crochetwork of skin committed to constant change Marvellous. I am on more tenuous ground however when it comes to plot, the first section seemed to be laying out a complex set of characters and story arcs but this very suddenly narrows to what feels like a different book in the last third. Unfortunately, for me this part read more as fable or allegory and I am never a good reader of those. However, I am convinced that I would gain a much deeper appreciation of this novel upon a second closer reading and with the added benefit of some critical analysis. As it stands I don't regret a moment of the time I spent reading and trying to puzzle out this novel.

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Repeatedly Physical Therapy Persuasive Letter attention is thrown on Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved fact that she's black-skinned. Toni Song Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved Solomon is a timeless classic and coming-of-age tale Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved told as only Queen isabella of spain Morrison can do in this moving and lyrical novel. Saying something is pitch black is like saying something Theme Of Revenge In Toni Morrisons Beloved green. This is a tough minded short novel. It moves and changes from one kind of black to another. This was my first experience with Toni Morrison's writing and it was probably not Tina Turner Research Paper usual entry point, most people seeming to start with Beloved or The Bluest Eye.

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